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True or False? I still need to wear a mask and social distance after I get vaccinated.

True. It remains important to continue taking precautions to prevent the spread of COVID-19 until experts tell us otherwise. These steps will help reduce the risk of becoming exposed or spreading the virus until the pandemic is over.

True. It remains important to continue taking precautions to prevent the spread of COVID-19 until experts tell us otherwise. These steps will help reduce the risk of becoming exposed or spreading the virus until the pandemic is over.

True. It remains important to continue taking precautions to prevent the spread of COVID-19 until experts tell us otherwise. These steps will help reduce the risk of becoming exposed or spreading the virus until the pandemic is over.

True or False? I can’t get COVID-19 from the vaccine.
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True. Neither of the vaccines now authorized for use for COVID-19 contain any live virus. It is impossible to get the disease from the vaccine.

True. Neither of the vaccines now authorized for use for COVID-19 contain any live virus. It is impossible to get the disease from the vaccine.

True. Neither of the vaccines now authorized for use for COVID-19 contain any live virus. It is impossible to get the disease from the vaccine.

True or False? The vaccine will reduce my risk of becoming sick with COVID-19.
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<True. The vaccines reduce the risk of developing symptoms and getting ill from the virus by about 95 percent after getting both doses. However, no vaccine, including the COVID-19 vaccines, guarantees protection against illness.

True. The vaccines reduce the risk of developing symptoms and getting ill from the virus by about 95 percent after getting both doses. However, no vaccine, including the COVID-19 vaccines, guarantees protection against illness.

True. The vaccines reduce the risk of developing symptoms and getting ill from the virus by about 95 percent after getting both doses. However, no vaccine, including the COVID-19 vaccines, guarantees protection against illness.

True or False? It doesn’t matter which COVID-19 vaccine I get.
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True. The two COVID-19 vaccines appear to be similar in terms of efficacy and safety. All people who get a COVID-19 vaccine should be monitored on site for at least 15 minutes after getting the injection. Those with a history of severe allergic reactions or those who have had any type of immediate allergic reaction to a vaccine or injectable therapy should be monitored for at least 30 minutes after vaccination.

<True. The two COVID-19 vaccines appear to be similar in terms of efficacy and safety. All people who get a COVID-19 vaccine should be monitored on site for at least 15 minutes after getting the injection. Those with a history of severe allergic reactions or those who have had any type of immediate allergic reaction to a vaccine or injectable therapy should be monitored for at least 30 minutes after vaccination.

True. The two COVID-19 vaccines appear to be similar in terms of efficacy and safety. All people who get a COVID-19 vaccine should be monitored on site for at least 15 minutes after getting the injection. Those with a history of severe allergic reactions or those who have had any type of immediate allergic reaction to a vaccine or injectable therapy should be monitored for at least 30 minutes after vaccination.

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True or False? I won’t be able to spread COVID-19 once I am vaccinated.

Unknown. We do not yet know for sure if getting vaccinated prevents us from becoming infected and spreading the disease to others. This is why we still need to follow safety precautions like wearing masks and physical distancing.

Unknown. We do not yet know for sure if getting vaccinated prevents us from becoming infected and spreading the disease to others. This is why we still need to follow safety precautions like wearing masks and physical distancing.

Unknown. We do not yet know for sure if getting vaccinated prevents us from becoming infected and spreading the disease to others. This is why we still need to follow safety precautions like wearing masks and physical distancing.

True or False? I will test positive on a COVID-19 nasal swab test after vaccination.
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False. You will not test positive on a nasal swab test since that looks for proteins or genetic material made by the COVID-19 virus. However, when your body develops antibodies as a result of vaccination, you may test positive on some antibody tests.

False. You will not test positive on a nasal swab test since that looks for proteins or genetic material made by the COVID-19 virus. However, when your body develops antibodies as a result of vaccination, you may test positive on some antibody tests.

False. You will not test positive on a nasal swab test since that looks for proteins or genetic material made by the COVID-19 virus. However, when your body develops antibodies as a result of vaccination, you may test positive on some antibody tests.

True or False? I’ve had COVID-19. I don’t need a vaccine.
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False. It is possible to get re-infected with COVID-19, though we do not know how often this happens. Until researchers know more about how long the protection lasts following a natural infection, you should get a vaccine even if you have a history of infection.

False. It is possible to get re-infected with COVID-19, though we do not know how often this happens. Until researchers know more about how long the protection lasts following a natural infection, you should get a vaccine even if you have a history of infection.

False. It is possible to get re-infected with COVID-19, though we do not know how often this happens. Until researchers know more about how long the protection lasts following a natural infection, you should get a vaccine even if you have a history of infection.

True or False? The mRNA vaccines, such as the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, will alter my DNA.
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False. The mRNA does not become part of your own DNA or change it. Instead, the mRNA from the vaccines instruct cells in the body to simply build copies of the virus’s spike protein that our bodies recognize as foreign. As a result, we develop antibodies against it to protect us from becoming sick if we come in contact with the virus that causes COVID-19.

False. The mRNA does not become part of your own DNA or change it. Instead, the mRNA from the vaccines instruct cells in the body to simply build copies of the virus’s spike protein that our bodies recognize as foreign. As a result, we develop antibodies against it to protect us from becoming sick if we come in contact with the virus that causes COVID-19.

False. The mRNA does not become part of your own DNA or change it. Instead, the mRNA from the vaccines instruct cells in the body to simply build copies of the virus’s spike protein that our bodies recognize as foreign. As a result, we develop antibodies against it to protect us from becoming sick if we come in contact with the virus that causes COVID-19.

True or False? I may have mild side effects after receiving the vaccine.
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<True. Many patients notice soreness, redness, or pain in the arm where they got the shot. Others may have fatigue, a mild fever, headache, or body aches for a day afterward. Side effects are more common after the second dose. These reactions are expected and will disappear quickly.

True. Many patients notice soreness, redness, or pain in the arm where they got the shot. Others may have fatigue, a mild fever, headache, or body aches for a day afterward. Side effects are more common after the second dose. These reactions are expected and will disappear quickly.

True. Many patients notice soreness, redness, or pain in the arm where they got the shot. Others may have fatigue, a mild fever, headache, or body aches for a day afterward. Side effects are more common after the second dose. These reactions are expected and will disappear quickly.

True or False? Children under age 16 cannot get a COVID-19 vaccine.
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True. Currently, the Pfizer vaccine can be given to people ages 16 and older. The Moderna vaccine is authorized for those ages 18 and older. However, clinical trials are underway with both vaccines in children ages 12 and older.

The immune system of children responds differently than that of adults. For that reason, testing is essential to see how teenagers, young children, and infants react to any vaccine, even if it is proven safe and effective in adults.

True. Currently, the Pfizer vaccine can be given to people ages 16 and older. The Moderna vaccine is authorized for those ages 18 and older. However, clinical trials are underway with both vaccines in children ages 12 and older.

The immune system of children responds differently than that of adults. For that reason, testing is essential to see how teenagers, young children, and infants react to any vaccine, even if it is proven safe and effective in adults.

True. Currently, the Pfizer vaccine can be given to people ages 16 and older. The Moderna vaccine is authorized for those ages 18 and older. However, clinical trials are underway with both vaccines in children ages 12 and older.

The immune system of children responds differently than that of adults. For that reason, testing is essential to see how teenagers, young children, and infants react to any vaccine, even if it is proven safe and effective in adults.

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