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CMCC 642

Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticle conjugates as components of systemic and mucosal vaccines

Inventors: Marian Neutra, Frank Robey, Andreas Frey

Invention Types: Research Tool, Therapeutics

Research Areas: Immunology, Oncology/Hematology, Infectious Disease

Keywords: Vaccine

For More Information Contact:  Meyer, Abbie

 

Invention Description:

Inventors at Children's Hospital have recently designed a new method for attaching antigens covalently to aluminum oxide nanoparticles. This strategy favors the preservation of the native conformation of the antigen. This novel technology was tested using a highly repetitive chain of recombinant antigen (peptide homopolymers derived from HIV-1 gp120) bound to the nanoparticles by a method that will not allow the antigen to readily dissociate. (Bioconjugate Chemistry. 1997, V. 8, N. 3, pg. 424-433) The size of this complex is ideal for phagocytosis by antigen presenting cells. The antigen-nanoparticle complexes induced the highest peptide-specific serum antibody responses as compared to a hydrophilic adjuvant given with the antigen or the antigen alone. Moreover, these antibodies showed the strongest reactivity towards recombinant, glycosylated gp120 and HIV-1 infected T cells. This novel vaccine approach may be useful for induction of immune responses against conformation-sensitive viral antigens without the need for additional adjuvants.

Applications:

Anti-angiogenesis
Research Tool
Vaccine

Competitive Advantages:

Each year, almost 1.5 million people will contract a disease such as HIV or Hepatitis, which could have been prevented by a vaccine. As a result, there is an enormous demand to create safer and more efficacious vaccines throughout the United States. Many current vaccines use pure antigen to trigger or boost an immune response, yet many of these antigens are not efficiently phagocytized by antigen presenting cells and are rapidly eliminated from the body. Vaccines have been bound to inorganic particles in order to increase phagocytosis and therefore enhance the immune response. However, these too have found difficulties due to the rapid detachment of the antigen from the inorganic particle within the body.

Business Opportunity:

Exclusive License

Key Publications: Bioconjugate Chemistry. 1997, V. 8, N. 3, pg. 424-433

IPStatus: Patented