Return to Main Site 617-919-3019
401 Park Drive, 7th Floor East, Boston, MA 02215

TIDO Technology Search



Invention Type

Diagnostic/Prognostic
Information Technology/Software
Medical Device
Other
Research Tool
Therapeutics

Research Area

Allergy/Respiratory/Pulmonary Disease
Anesthesia
Audiology
Cardiovascular/Cardiology
Degenerative Disease
Dermatology
Endocrinology
Gastrointestinal/Nutrition
Genetic Disease
Health Care Management
Immunology
Infectious Disease
Inflammation
Internal Medicine
Metabolic Disease
Musculoskeletal
Neonatology/Pediatric
Neurology/Neuroscience
Oncology/Hematology
Ophthalmology
Orthopedics
Otolaryngology/Audiology
Pain
Pathology
Personalized Medicine
Psychiatric Disease
Radiology
Regenerative Medicine
Reproduction/Ob-Gyn
Stem Cell
Surgery/Wound Healing
Urology
CMCC 540

Antiangiogenic Agents for Treatment of Endometriosis

Inventors: Nancy Klauber, Robert D'Amato

Invention Types: Therapeutics

Research Areas: Endocrinology, Reproduction/Ob-Gyn

Keywords: Anti-angiogenesis, New Indication/Use

For More Information Contact:  Dietz, Ryan

 

Invention Description:

Angiogenesis, the sprouting of new blood vessels, normally occurs in the female reproductive organs. Drs. D'Amato and Klauber have shown that anti-angiogenic agents can control fertility in mice. Moreover, anti-angiogenic therapies inhibited lesions in a mouse model of surgically induced endometriosis.

Applications:

This data suggests that anti-angiogenic agents could be used to prevent pregnancy and to treat endometriosis. Endometriosis is a debilitating condition that affects approximately 15% of females of reproductivage, with over 5.5 million women afflicted in the United States alone. It is estimated that 71-87% of women with chronic pelvic pain suffer from endometriosis and that 25-40% of infertility cases are the result of endometriosis. This form of therapy may also be used to treat other conditions of the female reproductive system such as adenmyosis, dysfunctional uterine bleeding, choriocarcinoma and ectopic pregnancy.

Competitive Advantages:

There is currently no cure for endometriosis, with extreme cases requiring a hysterectomy. Standard treatments, such as pain medications, hormones and surgeries to remove existing lesions, only alleviate symptoms temporarily and are associated with significant side effects, including osteoporosis. Dr. D'Amato and colleagues have found that the vasculature is a novel target for treatment of endometriosis. The invention disclosed here is a novel treatment for endometriosis and other disorders which affect the female reproductive tract.

Business Opportunity:

License

Key Publications: Nature Medicine, 1997 Apr;3(4):443-6.

IPStatus: Patented